dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

NY Times: How to Be a Stoic.

Participants in Stoic Week reported  a 9 percent increase in positive emotions, an 11 percent decrease in negative emotions and a 14 percent improvement in life satisfaction after one week of practice.

02/06/15 • 10:06 AM • HistoryPsychologyReligionScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: English majors are declining in popularity.

I’ve told the story before; everyone I knew on Wall Street, virtually none held ‘practical’ degrees (as described in this article). More English and Philosophy majors than anything else. On Wall Street!

02/04/15 • 11:17 AM • PersonalScholarly • (4) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

CR4/Blog Entry: How to Get a Photographic Memory.

Memory palaces were invented by the Greeks and Romans, most popularly Cicero. Credit where credit is due.

02/02/15 • 10:16 AM • ScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Ancient skull from Galilee cave offers clues to the first modern Europeans

The skull has a distinctive ‘bun’-shaped occipital region at the back. In this way its shape resembles modern African and European skulls, but differs from other anatomically modern humans from the Levant. This suggests that the Manot people could be closely related to the first modern humans that later colonized Europe.” Pretty big news, all in all. Surprised more haven’t picked up on it.

01/29/15 • 10:07 AM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Tutankhamun’s botched beard: conservation chief demoted to royal vehicles role.

Last week, her duties included the conservation of one of the world’s most important collection of artefacts, including Tutankhamun’s fabled death mask and jewellery, as well as hundreds of ancient mummies, tombs and statues. From now on her role will be limited to overseeing the contents of Egypt’s royal stables.”  A judgment worthy of Hatshepsut.

01/28/15 • 12:11 PM • ArtsHistoryScholarlyScienceTravel • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: Dementia ‘linked’ to common over-the-counter drugs.

Hmmm. “The study estimated that people taking at least 10 mg/day of doxepin (antidepressant), 4 mg/day of diphenhydramine (a sleep aid), or 5 mg/day of oxybutynin (a urinary incontinence drug) for more than three years would be at greater risk of developing dementia.”

01/26/15 • 12:43 PM • HealthScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

medievalbooks: Medieval Speech Bubbles.

Even bubble-less. Clever.

01/26/15 • 12:20 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Graeco-Roman necropolis uncovered in Alexandria.

Ooooh. You know that Alexander’s tomb is still yet to be found ...

01/23/15 • 12:12 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LiveScience: Mummy Mask May Reveal Oldest Known Gospel.

Evans said that the research team will publish the first volume of texts obtained through the mummy masks and cartonnage later this year. It will include the gospel fragment that the researchers believe dates back to the first century. ” Keeping my eyes peeled for this one. If there are even minor differences, it’ll shake the foundations of Christianity.

01/18/15 • 09:10 PM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (3) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Weighing up the evidence for the ‘Historical Jesus’.

Of interest.

01/04/15 • 11:44 AM • ReligionScholarlyScience • (4) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Weekly Standard: Master Class.

On sparing words, Casey recalls that his agent and his editor both judged a 604-page novel he’d sent them as much too long, so for several months he reworked it, cutting 100 pages but adding a few in the process. When he sent it back, now 640 pages, the agent and editor wrote him, separately, ‘Good. It’s much shorter.’”  I love that anecdote. There’s writing, and then there’s writing.

12/23/14 • 01:59 PM • ArtsBooksScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: Skeleton from Greek mystery tomb to be identified next month.

The result of macroscopic study of the bone tissue (identifying) sex, age and height will be announced in January.

12/20/14 • 08:09 PM • HistoryScholarlyScienceTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Art Daily: Hebrew U. archaeologists find 20-meter-high corridor at Herodium National Park.

Better and more photos, please.

Later: Two impressive interior photos here.

12/18/14 • 08:06 PM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Chronicle of Higher Ed: Payback’s a Bitch.

Most other industrialized countries offer free college enrollment because it is an investment in their future, and, in some cases, because it is considered a basic citizenly right. [snip] In the United States, we have turned this essential social good into the cruellest of debt traps.

12/16/14 • 10:22 AM • ChildhoodEconomicsPoliticsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt.

The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC.” Atenism? Proselytized internationally? Lordy, what a find. This should shake western religion to the core.

12/08/14 • 10:36 AM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: Old Sarum archaeologists reveal plan of medieval city.

Our survey shows where individual buildings are located and from this we can piece together a detailed picture of the urban plan within the city walls.” And without even a spadeful of dirt being lifted. Impressive!

12/02/14 • 08:31 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: Why didn’t a Rolling Stone writer talk to the alleged perpetrators of a gang rape?

Of note. The authors of this piece don’t say it straight out, but they seem to smell something wrong.

12/02/14 • 07:23 PM • Human RightsLawScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Diane Ravitch Blog: How to Analyze False Claims about Charter Schools.

An op-ed by Congressman Danny Davis noted that the Noble Network suspends 51% of its students at least once during a school year. This includes suspending 88% of the African American students who attend its schools. It might be hard to understand why a school would want to suspend so many of its students … until you realize that this encourages students to leave. And it specifically encourages the more challenging students, the ones most likely to bring down test scores and college graduation rates, to depart.” Flagged as an important read. Go. Now.

12/02/14 • 01:42 PM • ChildhoodEconomicsHome & LivingHuman RightsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: Richard III’s DNA throws up infidelity surprise.

Okay - repeat after me - “I LOVE science.”

Later: The Guardian has more details on the genealogical ramifications of broken royal lineage.

12/02/14 • 01:16 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Secrets of Celtic ‘princess of the Danube’ revealed.

No one knows whether the mysteries preserved in this astonishing grave will ever be
 solved. Archaeologists expect to spend many more years on the case.
” Quite cool. I love that they mention waiting for tech to mature, to find out more.

12/02/14 • 11:06 AM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

MeFi: Nature will make its articles back to 1869 free to share online.

All research papers from Nature will be made free to read in ReadCube, a proprietary screen-view format that can be annotated but not copied, printed, or downloaded.

More on ReadCube.

12/02/14 • 09:05 AM • InternetScholarlyScienceSoftware • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

IBT: Mystery Roman Fertility God Discovered at Sacred Turkish Site Baffles Scholars.

The basalt stele shows a deity growing from a chalice of leaves. Its long stem rises from a cone that is ornamented with astral symbols. From the sides of the cone grow a long horn and a tree, which the deity clasps with his right hand. The pictorial elements suggest that a fertility god is depicted.” Well, we need some new gods.

12/01/14 • 04:38 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

CJR: The Texas school board isn’t as powerful as you think.

‘They [dm! note: speaking about journalists] — how should I say this — they don’t look at the story real closely.’ If they did, they would see that Texas schools do not have to use the textbooks that the board approves. In 2011, a new state law made it possible for school districts to use textbooks that are not on the board-approved list. Many (though not most) districts are already reveling in their newfound flexibility.” I suspected, given the rise of e-texts and other modernizing/computerizing influences, that Texas was ripe for disruption.

Extra good point about certain political groups fanning the flames to increase donations.

12/01/14 • 11:41 AM • BooksChildhoodPoliticsReligionScholarly • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Ancient Origins: Archaeologists reveal new secrets of ancient tomb at Kasta Hill.

Nice 3D flythrough.

11/30/14 • 09:48 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Occupant of Amphipolis tomb remains unknown.

I had said some time ago that with a lion on top of such a massive monument, it could be the tomb of a general. [snip] When the skeleton was found, an archaeologist could never say if it is a man or a woman.” Patience.

11/29/14 • 06:36 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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