dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

TNR: A Defense of Reason.

Reason is an intensely romantic pursuit, especially if one finds romance in struggle. Reason’s victories are almost never final. It is always surrounded by unreason, which is always more popular.

11/20/14 • 09:28 AM • PsychologyScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Dazed: UK students graduate with even more debt than Americans.

According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies, students will graduate with an average of £44,035 of student debt. America’s class of 2014, on the other hand, will only graduate $33,000 in debt. ” Doesn’t seem so much until you convert Pounds to dollars [scratching on paper ... roughly] $68,900 or so. Double American students’ debt.  Shame on you, Britain, for being taken in by capitalist shpiel.

11/18/14 • 10:51 AM • ChildhoodEconomicsPoliticsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Western Digs: Utah Cave Full of Children’s Moccasins Sheds Light on Little-Known Culture.

Wonderful finds.

11/17/14 • 11:57 AM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Byzantine cistern filled with cement.

Pesky, inconvenient history ... finding more of the Forum of Theodosius would be extremely valuable.

11/14/14 • 06:26 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Greek Reporter Europe: Mosaics Revealed at Ancient Greek City of Zeugma in Turkey.

Check this out. Absolutely stunning mosaics.

11/14/14 • 11:17 AM • HistoryScholarlyScienceTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: “Crappy Gabor paper” - Overly honest citation slips into peer-reviewed journal Ethology.

Typos and editing mistakes are common on blogs and even in print newspapers, where reporters and editors are working on tight deadlines. But academics typically have weeks or even months to edit a paper before the journal goes to press, and the peer review process means that it has to go through close reads by multiple experts in the relevant field.” Time is no barrier to bad editing or poor proofreading. “Meticulous care” is a trait that is neither respected nor fairly compensated these days. So it’s never taken.

11/13/14 • 09:18 AM • ArtsBooksScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Underground ‘vault’ found at Amphipolis tomb.

Still hope.

11/01/14 • 12:51 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Adobe Education: The University of Texas at Austin Develops its First Course App.

College students utilize mobile devices to consume all their digital content and they prefer apps to websites to access information, engage with their social networks and share their opinions.” Developers take note.

11/01/14 • 11:58 AM • ChildhoodProgrammingScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

HyperAllergic: What Do Classical Antiquities Look Like in Color?

Tacky and cartoony, with paint. Always made me question Greek ‘classical’ tastes. Must’ve been like living in Las Vegas or a Disney theme park.

10/31/14 • 11:45 AM • ArtsHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Statesman: Treasure trails - how museums became diplomatic fixers.

Yes. I used to think antiquities should be repatriated; the Bamiyan Buddhas and other events of late have convinced me it is better to take mankind’s common heritage and spread it as widely as possible so we cannot lose it. So I vote ‘no’ on the Elgin marbles now.

10/22/14 • 10:21 AM • ArtsHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BookForum: Innovators Abroad.

... technological development is also a human story — one that involves politics, war, culture, discrimination, social upheaval, and a great deal of human exploitation thousands of miles down the production line, in Congo’s coltan mines and Shenzhen’s brutal factories.

10/21/14 • 10:48 AM • BooksHistoryHuman RightsScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Daily Mail.UK: Tutankhamun had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth ...

Some interesting theoretical leaps being taken here.

10/20/14 • 12:58 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Harvard University Press: The digital Loeb Classical Library is now online.

Here. Students of Latin and Greek rejoice.

10/17/14 • 07:47 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: How AP US History classes became the new culture war battleground.

My time in AP History seemed to revolve around the Civil War. The only thing I recall from that course was discussions of the Gag Rule. It really didn’t give me more information than I was already finding through my own curiousity at the public library and my old man’s collection of books (reading materials for his officer’s courses in the Marines). The original three-volume set of Lee’s Lieutenants: A Study in Command, for instance.

10/17/14 • 10:13 AM • HistoryPersonalScholarly • (3) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Nice Marmot: Blogging like it’s 1999.

Yes!

Later: Dr Vornov says, “With our symbolic tools of language that abstract the maps into notes, conversations and blog posts, we can get out of our heads and team up with other minds to improve the usefulness of our internal maps, even to the point of knowing things that are beyond any ability to experience.” 

This post has been simmering in the back of my head as I’ve been running around town today, and I wanted to expand on it. I think of how fellow bloggers, my readers and others have shaped my perception of reality, my interpretation of events, my interpretations of groups of facts over the years. It’s been invaluable. However, after near fifteen years of blogging, I have to face my own … sluggishness? … to change the mental maps of late. I wasn’t so slow to change in ’99. Today? Glacial by comparison. Is it age? Is it exposure to poor quality articles? Is it comfort in an attractive rut? Is it a reflection of the knee-jerk post-9/11 fear-and-panic in our culture? I know it’s not media-driven - I don’t watch television! Not even Jon Stewart (though he served me drinks at City Gardens in Trenton eons ago). That seems to shock people.

I circle back to something the Barrett boys [Cam and Damien] underlined for me. Weblogs are best when they’re about stories. A good story is from the heart, from the soul. “I lived this.” A good story changes my mental map, because it is a convincing direct experience I can feel. It’s the direct experience I don’t have, but when I hear it from a person I trust, it bends my opinion to the bloggers’ experience. My mental map extends beyond my direct ken.

Why are today’s stories not changing my maps? Why are stories less compelling than they were? I think it’s because there’s a difference between a fellow blogger, posting as a virtual friend, and a stranger posting a story to Medium or other venue. Stories are told at an arm’s length now - even worse, when they’re on sites with no comment areas. There is no interaction. And historical storytelling has always been about adjustments for the audience as the story is being acted out. I think of the famous photo, the elder at the bonfire, spinning out stories to the next generations, animated look on his face. Our old blogger-banter served that need for interaction - that banter, that back-and-forth is largely gone today.

I suppose that’s why I mourn for the ‘old days’ of blogging.  And I make a mental note (scribbled on my mental map margin) to tell more stories.

10/15/14 • 12:04 PM • PersonalPsychologyScholarlyWeblogs • (3) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Daily Kos: Germany offers free college tuition to U.S. and international students.

Wow. Totally great. And I was just cracking open a Goethe again - and preparing for the next Presidential season by reading Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. Zeit für mich zu lernen Deutsch. Thanks, Craig.

10/10/14 • 03:36 PM • ChildhoodScholarlyTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Nautilus: Shakespeare’s Genius Is Nonsense.

We are provided with so much activity from so many overlapping and interacting relationships between words that we do not notice the jags and hiccups, nor our own proficiency in accommodating for them.” A jester of words and rhythm.

10/09/14 • 01:17 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (8) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: ‘Grit’ might be more important than IQ. Now schools need to learn to teach it.

Being smart in school isn’t enough. The focus has turned to whether students have grit — whether they can keep going in the face of setbacks to achieve long-term goals.”  Hah.

10/09/14 • 09:30 AM • ChildhoodPsychologyScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

SciAm/Nature: Manure Fertilizer Increases Antibiotic Resistance.

Perhaps we’ve been enriching inadvertently for bugs that could eventually jump across agriculture to hospitals. [snip] Before we say anything about ‘nitrogen treatment is terrible and organic is wonderful’, we need to see what the downsides are.

10/06/14 • 04:12 PM • FoodHealthScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

AndrewGelman: Are Ivy League schools overrated?

Um ... it’s more than just the good-old-boys network. Ivy League schools are tribal.

10/01/14 • 12:28 PM • ChildhoodHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: New dinosaur from New Mexico has relatives in Alberta.

The horns on the back of the skull are thick and curve downwards, and the snout has a mixture of flat and bumpy scales—an unusual feature for an ankylosaurid.” No doubt the snout was caused by the enormous amounts of prehistoric green chile eaten ... (joking, just joking) ...

09/25/14 • 02:21 PM • HistorySanta Fe LocalScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Amphipolis ‘Caryatids’ hint Olympias may lie within.

These female sculptures may specifically be Klodones, priestesses of Dionysus with whom Olympias, Alexander the Great’s mother, consorted.

09/25/14 • 02:17 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Fourth chamber may hold key to Amphipolis riddle.

It seems quite likely that the third entrance, which is not centred in the fourth wall but is shifted towards the left, leads, possibly via a stairway, to a lower level.” [Panting in anticipation.]

09/24/14 • 04:49 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: Why grammar pedants miss the point.

Personally, I simply want to be able to understand what I’m reading. Spelling and grammar have a minimum-acceptable level, IMHO. If someone’s in a rush, I’ll forgive mistakes. News agencies with editorial and proofing staffs ... I’ll be ruthless.

09/24/14 • 11:10 AM • GeneralPsychologyScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Deciding who should pay to publish peer-reviewed scientific research.

But how can these [open-access] journals survive? They do that by charging the author. Fees range anywhere from $100–$1000 or so.” So, as we continue to argue our points, we need to be careful to source the journals we’re pulling studies from. I promise to try to link the originating journal’s source docs when I pull a study from now on.

09/18/14 • 08:59 AM • ScholarlyScienceWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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