dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

BillMoyers.com: What Would Joseph Campbell Say About Donald Trump?

Unlike the hero who serves humanity, Trump is simultaneously serving his own self-destructive “dark side” while calling forth America’s dark side — bullies obsessed with money, power and materialistic success, absorbed with their own hubris and empire. Instead of trying to improve the system and make it better for all, he is trying to blow it up. The alternative he offers would be chaos.

08/19/16 • 05:00 PM • BooksHistoryPoliticsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

OpenCulture: What Ancient Latin Sounded Like, And How We Know It.

I’d like to see some mention about how it has been perpetuated as a living language in the Catholic church over this long time period, rather than ignoring that vector of input.

08/19/16 • 10:28 AM • ArtsBooksScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Pop Arch: Tree-rings reveal secret clocks that could reset key dates across the ancient world.

In the past, we have had floating estimates of when things may have happened, but these secret clocks could reset chronologies concerning important world civilizations with the potential to date events that happened many thousands of years ago to the exact year.” Two radiation spikes at 775 and 994 CE, visible in all trees across the globe, will change dates on many major events in our history books. Huzzah!

08/17/16 • 09:00 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: Shadi Hamid on Islamic exceptionalism.

Islamism is by definition illiberal, and they would promote things that are contrary to classical liberalism, in the sense of non-negotiable personal rights and freedoms, gender equality, protection of minorities.” Another information point, for those curious.

08/16/16 • 11:56 AM • NewsPoliticsReligionScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Eidolon: Re-Queering Sappho.

Notable.

08/16/16 • 10:39 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryHuman RightsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

AtlasObscura: Rebel Virgins and Desert Mothers Written Out of Christianity’s Early History.

Yes, they’ve gotten short shrift. Mary Magdalene should have become head of the apostles, really, as first apostle of the resurrection (first person to see Christ after he had risen). The troubled Paul sealed in the male authoritarianism. This article’s a bit fluffy; see “The Closing of the Western Mind.” Highly recommended. I found it a page-turner.

08/15/16 • 03:18 PM • ReligionScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago: Catalog of Publications.

Free ebooks. Well, PDFs. Or purchase dead tree copies. Always nice to give back to scholarly institutions ...

08/12/16 • 08:15 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarlyScience • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Human burial found in the middle of sacrificial altar at Mt. Lykaion.

Human sacrifice? More digging to come.

08/11/16 • 12:01 PM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: At ancient Syria site, IS discovers then destroys treasures.

When the Islamic State group captured Tal Ajaja, one of Syria’s most important Assyrian-era sites, they discovered previously unknown millennia-old statues and cuneiform tablets, and then they destroyed them.”  AAAARRRRRRGGGHHHHHH.

08/08/16 • 01:50 PM • HistoryPoliticsReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Dazed (UK): Going to university is officially not worth it, says study.

The research – published last week – claims that your university degree could be leaving you perpetually out of pocket unless you go to Oxbridge or become a doctor.

08/08/16 • 12:27 PM • ChildhoodEconomicsHome & LivingScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Christie’s: Five minutes with Einstein’s leather jacket.

Hold your nose. Thanks, Tom E.

08/08/16 • 10:58 AM • GeneralHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Duluth News-Tribune: Renowned Ojibwe author Jim Northrup remembered.

In Vietnam, Bob Hope came to help us celebrate Christmas. I couldn’t figure out the link between peace on earth and a rice paddy fire fight. Today there is no tree inside my house. We just leave them outside where they continue to grow.” RIP. Your voice and thought will be missed. Of note: Ojibwe funeral traditions.

08/04/16 • 04:26 PM • BooksHistoryHuman RightsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The New Yorker: How Rousseau Predicted Trump.

He simply assumed that his own experience of social disadvantage and poverty — though he was rarely truly poor and had a knack for finding wealthy patrons—sufficed to make his arguments superior to those of people who lived more privileged lives.” Presaged might be a better term.

08/03/16 • 09:22 AM • BooksHistoryHuman RightsScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: UT Tower shooting survivor speaks out against new campus carry law in Texas.

There’s a lot of debating going on within university and faculty about what they can and cannot say regarding guns in classrooms and to me it’s just a shame that we’re even having these discussions. It’s just wrong to have guns be allowed in a classroom where you can’t have your cellphone or eat a hamburger.” It is ridiculous.

08/01/16 • 05:46 PM • ChildhoodLawScholarlySecurity • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Scientist: Mysterious dark brain cells linked to Alzheimer’s and stress.

Studies in patients show that inflammation arising outside the brain is associated with more rapid decline in Alzheimer’s patients, and it’s important to unravel what role microglia might play in this acceleration of disease.” Oh please no.

08/01/16 • 02:42 PM • HealthScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Facial reconstruction made of Bronze Age woman ‘Ava’.

So, creating a facial reconstruction based on archaeological remains is somewhat different in that a greater amount of artistic licence can be allowed.” Still fascinating, though.

08/01/16 • 02:40 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Atlantic: How Women Are Harassed Out of Science.

Zero tolerance for such harassment.

07/26/16 • 10:45 AM • Human RightsLawScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Atlantic: Success in High School Doesn’t Mean Good Grades in College.

Instead, the pair thinks that if high schools want to prepare students for college, they should focus less on specific content and more on critical thinking and reasoning.” I agree. My experience in AP classes revealed a great variation in curriculum compared to what was expected on the test; I felt ill-prepared when facing those questions. But my experience was umpteen decades ago.

The selection of ‘advanced’ students was even more wobbly, in my view. Such programs tend to look for students whose performance is improving beyond baseline; this is an inaccurate metric in isolation. Using myself as an example: I wanted to attend AP English. But I was bored, having already read through the assigned reading materials, so my performance was declining out of lack of mental stimulation. I didn’t make it. So I took an elective in “Journalism” instead.

Ultimately, on my first day in college, I was asked to write a paper. I’d already skimmed the table of contents of the assigned “English textbook”, so I gave them everything the book covered, and much more. Within minutes of arriving at my very second class in “college English”, the instructor marched me down to the Department head and she waived all English requirements for my degree, clearing me for anything I wanted to take, including electives.

Here’s the question: Would the AP course have made me any better? I wonder.

High school is not college. And I don’t think there’s any way to approximate the experience in a high school setting. It’s more than just the classes and curricula. You are challenged in multifarious ways, this often being the first time a child is truly ‘on their own’, eliciting different responses in different kids. So yes, critical thinking and reasoning.

07/26/16 • 10:24 AM • ChildhoodPersonalScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

SciAm: Human Brain Mapped in Unprecedented Detail.

Yet until now, most such maps have been based on a single type of measurement. That can provide an incomplete or even misleading view of the brain’s inner workings ...

07/20/16 • 02:34 PM • HealthScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Chronicle of Higher Ed: What Classics Professors Can Teach the Rest of Us.

Yet little seems to rub off. Today’s writers seemed mired in descriptive trivia that the writers of classics simply didn’t need in order to paint a lively tableau. Perhaps it is my age - I don’t need to have my imagination prompted. I suspect today’s Disney-raised need textual cartoons to paint their cerebellums.

I would not change my era or childhood for *anything*.

Case in point: “Adrenalized coots”, “hotheaded moorhens”, “sly-bones heron”, “susurrant reeds”? Fellow writers, can you not see the thesaurus being hauled out for those? You can feel the streeeeeetch. Words over feelings, emotions. Words that break the song of location.

From my journal this weekend by the South Fork of the Rio:

There is a peace - a zen space - in watching the dance of sedge-flies in the morning, arcing and lilting over the water. A glancing touch on the surface, a sudden swirl ... swift death by trout. Chipmunks dart through the boulders and dead wood searching for forgotten morsels. Red-shafted flickers spark their crimson underwings seeking an easy insect breakfast buffet in the beetle-ridden deadwood. You can hear the river at work. Dull bass booms as the rocks shift. Curious, that flora and fauna manage to manifest such joy and happiness in the face of daily mortal danger, yet we humans seem to always be bored, testy and unsatisfied. An eddy in the river ... suds. Sticks to the rocks like plaque to teeth. Who would be so inconsiderate? Mother Nature has much to teach us, if we still have the capacity to listen. If we don’t murder her first.

I like those, but do not consider them finished thoughts; even that feels ‘not spare enough’.

07/19/16 • 10:15 AM • ArtsBooksPersonalScholarly • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mashable: New ‘Hamilton’ cast members announced as Lin-Manuel Miranda departs.

Have faith, fans. The first casts are not always the best. Who remembers Michael Allinson and Margot Moser, the original My Fair Lady cast? Even Wikipedia is wrong - these two opened the Broadway show from ‘56 to ‘61, playing 2,717 times before Rex Harrison nabbed the spotlight in ‘62.

Wikipedia, more and more, seems to be edited by younger folks who’ve never cracked a book in their lives. Trolling the internet itself for answers to give quality reference content is like the ouroboros (snake devouring a snake).

07/06/16 • 02:51 PM • EntertainmentHistoryScholarly • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Atlantic: When Student Activists Refuse to Talk to Campus Newspapers.

Student activists at Smith College told student journalists they would be barred from a black-solidarity rally unless they vowed to ‘participate and articulate their solidarity with black students and students of color.’” One wonders what happens to these kids when they hit the real world, and it sticks a big fat finger in their eye.

06/30/16 • 08:40 PM • ChildhoodNewsScholarly • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ANN: Fix for 3-billion-year-old genetic error could dramatically improve genetic sequencing.

The new innovation engineered at UT Austin is an enzyme that performs reverse transcription but can also “proofread,” or check its work while copying genetic code. The enzyme allows, for the first time, for large amounts of RNA information to be copied with near perfect accuracy.” Exciting and mind-blowing. On the flip side, let’s hope it doesn’t make viruses more potent.

06/26/16 • 11:37 AM • HealthScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Toast: Female Philosophers of the Early Modern Era.

Here’s another list of seventeenth century philosophers: Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Mary Astell, Damaris Masham, Catherine Cockburn, Bathsua Makin. You can take a philosophy degree, including Early Modern philosophy, and not come across a single one of these women.

06/26/16 • 09:25 AM • HistoryHuman RightsScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ANN: Codex Rossanensis, original Biblical manuscript, goes on display in Calabria.

Looks rather amazing.

06/22/16 • 08:55 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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