dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

Archaeology News Network: New dinosaur from New Mexico has relatives in Alberta.

The horns on the back of the skull are thick and curve downwards, and the snout has a mixture of flat and bumpy scales—an unusual feature for an ankylosaurid.” No doubt the snout was caused by the enormous amounts of prehistoric green chile eaten ... (joking, just joking) ...

09/25/14 • 02:21 PM • HistorySanta Fe LocalScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Amphipolis ‘Caryatids’ hint Olympias may lie within.

These female sculptures may specifically be Klodones, priestesses of Dionysus with whom Olympias, Alexander the Great’s mother, consorted.

09/25/14 • 02:17 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Fourth chamber may hold key to Amphipolis riddle.

It seems quite likely that the third entrance, which is not centred in the fourth wall but is shifted towards the left, leads, possibly via a stairway, to a lower level.” [Panting in anticipation.]

09/24/14 • 04:49 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: Why grammar pedants miss the point.

Personally, I simply want to be able to understand what I’m reading. Spelling and grammar have a minimum-acceptable level, IMHO. If someone’s in a rush, I’ll forgive mistakes. News agencies with editorial and proofing staffs ... I’ll be ruthless.

09/24/14 • 11:10 AM • GeneralPsychologyScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Deciding who should pay to publish peer-reviewed scientific research.

But how can these [open-access] journals survive? They do that by charging the author. Fees range anywhere from $100–$1000 or so.” So, as we continue to argue our points, we need to be careful to source the journals we’re pulling studies from. I promise to try to link the originating journal’s source docs when I pull a study from now on.

09/18/14 • 08:59 AM • ScholarlyScienceWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ISAW Papers: “The Cosmos in the Antikythera Mechanism.”

This is a couple of years old, but since the mechanism is in the news these days, I thought it might enlighten some who didn’t take the time to skim through it.

09/17/14 • 11:36 AM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Massive 5,000 yr old stone structure found in Israel.

The shape may have had symbolic importance, as the lunar crescent is a symbol of an ancient Mesopotamian moon god named Sin.

09/16/14 • 12:33 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Texas proposes rewriting school text books to deny manmade climate change.

Stop it (again). I deal with so many clients overseas now, I find myself constantly apologizing for media-reported American idiocies.

09/16/14 • 11:28 AM • EnvironmentalPoliticsReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Third chamber at Amphipolis tomb deemed unstable.

Includes a diagram of the tomb, as excavated. I wonder if they couldn’t also remove the overburden above the tomb, to reduce the weight.

09/14/14 • 04:04 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Crux: Photos from inside the Vatican Secret Archives.

Tantalizing bits.

09/10/14 • 03:58 PM • HistoryReligionScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

PS Mag: For-Profit Colleges Are Equivalent to High School.

Community colleges, in other words, open just as many doors to possibility as for-profit ones.” Not surprised. Talked to one for-profit grad who ‘majored in Powerpoint’. Yeah! That holds up well against this.

09/03/14 • 05:27 PM • ChildhoodEconomicsHome & LivingScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Video footage of Amphipolis tomb from the air.

Not on the scale of the pyramids, certainly, but still impressive.

09/02/14 • 11:27 AM • HistoryMotion GraphicsScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Past Horizons: Roman wooden toilet seat found at Vindolanda.

Now we need to find the toilet that went with it as Roman loos are fascinating places to excavate – their drains often contain astonishing artefacts. Let’s face it, if you drop something down a Roman latrine you are unlikely to attempt to fish it out unless you are pretty brave or foolhardy.”  I have to ask, who’s the poor sod who has to fish it out of the very-well-ripened bog? I mean, look at that photo. Eeee-yuck. I’d wear noseplugs.

08/28/14 • 02:44 PM • HealthHistoryScholarlyScienceTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Monarch butterflies plummet 90 percent, need protection.

I’ve not seen one in at least five years.  We used to have a couple dozen sail through and drink at puddles.

08/28/14 • 02:42 PM • EnvironmentalNatureScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Inside the antechamber of the Amphipolis tomb.

The hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted sculpture are of concern to scientists and indicate that the tomb may have been plundered long ago.” Drats. ‘Course, it depends on what ancients thought was valuable (precious metals, likely) ... treasures may still be found.

08/27/14 • 10:06 AM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

OpenCulture: The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Most Popular Physics Book Ever Written, Now Completely

Noted, bookmarked.

08/26/14 • 11:32 AM • BooksHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Hyperallergic: Cultural Destruction by Islamic State Continues with No End in Sight.

The opening GIF animation pretty much says it all.

08/26/14 • 11:09 AM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Amphipolis tomb entrance gradually revealed.

More and more tantalizing. Read the comment, also.

08/25/14 • 12:10 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NPR Interview: Benedict Carey, Author Of ‘How We Learn’.

Uh-huh. As I’ve mentioned copiously over the years, the ancient Greeks walked their students around while teaching. Seeing as how so much of ancient Greek knowledge is still kicking around, I think that proves out the theory of benefit.

08/25/14 • 11:40 AM • HistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: 250 years of English grammar usage advice.

For the past two and a half years, I’ve been working on a database of more than 75 usage guides and 123 usage problems in the English language, spanning a period of nearly 250 years. My two assistants and I call this project the Hyper Usage Guide of English or HUGE database and it’s based out of Leiden University in the Netherlands.” Aw, fantastic.

08/07/14 • 09:31 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Facts can convince conservatives about global warming – sometimes.

There are two pieces of good news in this new study indicating that information does make a difference and climate education isn’t a lost cause.” Keep dropping facts in ears.

08/07/14 • 01:01 PM • EnvironmentalNatureScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Archaeology News Network: Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not new ‘hobbit’ human.

LB1’s short thighbones not only match the height reduction seen in Down syndrome, Eckhardt said, but when corrected statistically for normal growth, they would yield a stature of about 1.26 meters, or just over four feet, a figure matched by some humans now living on Flores and in surrounding regions.” Sorry, Frodo. Not a relative.

08/06/14 • 10:59 AM • HealthHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mapping the Nation: An unrecognizable United States.

Buenos dias.

08/06/14 • 09:50 AM • HistorySanta Fe LocalScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Past Horizons: 6,500 Ur skeleton re-discovered in museum collection.

Reaching below sea level, Woolley determined that the original site of Ur had been a small island in a surrounding marsh. Then a great flood covered the land. People continued to live and flourish at Ur, but the disaster may have inspired legends. The first known recorded story of an epic flood comes from Sumer, now southern Iraq, and it is generally believed to be the historic precursor of the Biblical flood story written millennia later.

08/05/14 • 03:27 PM • HistoryReligionScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Popular Archaeology: Did Deforestation Really Lead to Societal Collapse in Chaco Canyon?

Our point [snip] is that we do not know where most of the wood in Chaco great houses originated, and we cannot eliminate local (canyon drainage) sources. Consequently there is no basis for concluding that the abandonment of Chaco Canyon was brought on by deforestation, improvident use of natural resources, or unstable exchange relationships, and therefore there is no reason to use Chaco’s history as a warning from the past about societal failure.”  Indeed. They have so much research on the area, that I understand scientists have only made it up to the early 1900’s documentation.

Later: Sorry for the ugly title. Fixed.

07/29/14 • 11:57 AM • EnvironmentalHistoryNatureSanta Fe LocalScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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