dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

City Arts: Stop Using ‘Poet Voice’.

The voice flattens the musicality and tonal drama inherent within the language of the poem, and it also sounds overly stuffy and learned. In this way, Poet Voice does a disservice to the poem, the poet and poetry. It must be stopped.”  I give the poet a break; it must be terribly hard to read one’s own work. There’s a deal of baggage involved. My memory still resounds with the crypt-like croak of an elderly TS Eliot reading “Prufrock”.  I’ll pass.

07/22/14 • 09:22 AM • ArtsBooksPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NCBI/PubMed: Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children, Religious and Secular.

Secular children were more likely than religious children to judge the protagonist in such fantastical stories to be fictional. The results suggest that exposure to religious ideas has a powerful impact on children’s differentiation between reality and fiction, not just for religious stories but also for fantastical stories.

07/21/14 • 12:42 PM • ChildhoodPsychologyReligionScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mosaic: Can meditation really slow ageing?

Researchers have since linked perceived stress to shorter telomeres in healthy women as well as in Alzheimer’s caregivers, victims of domestic abuse and early life trauma, and people with major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

07/20/14 • 10:44 PM • HealthPsychologyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

FiveThirtyEight: Dying at the Grand Canyon.

Erm, go observe in person. When I visited the park, the number of both American and European tourists prancing [I chose that word carefully and accurately] down the Bright Angel Trail with just a single water bottle stunned me.

07/20/14 • 10:43 PM • EnvironmentalHealthNewsPhysical FitnessPsychology • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Yorker: How to Be a Better Online Reader.

Certainly, as we turn to online reading, the physiology of the reading process itself shifts; we don’t read the same way online as we do on paper.

07/18/14 • 09:46 AM • ArtsBooksInternetMobilePsychologyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Republic: Interruptions at Work Make You Way Less Productive.

Researchers have known for a while that interruptions inhibit our ability to carry out many tasks—from detecting traffic signals to performing surgery. This study is unique, though, in looking at—and quantifying—how distractions affect the caliber of creative work.

07/17/14 • 03:38 PM • ArtsDesignHealthProgrammingPsychologyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mischiefs of Faction: Impeachable offenses are in the eyes of the beholders (part 1).

The question is, impeachable for what, exactly?  Listed under “Psychology” for psychoceramic reasons.

07/17/14 • 03:37 PM • LawPoliticsPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Notes from the Milk Cave.

Even if someone had told me ‘twenty minutes per breast per feeding,’ it would still have taken sitting down every two hours for forty minutes for me to understand, because just like every other aspect of pregnancy and motherhood—morning sickness, contractions—the imagined experience turned out to be laughably unlike the experience itself.

07/17/14 • 12:02 PM • ChildhoodHome & LivingInternetMobilePsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Wired: Even the Gorillas and Bears in Our Zoos Are Hooked on Prozac.

In fact when Gus first arrived from an Ohio zoo in 1988, his favorite game was stalking children from the underwater window in his pool. [snip] But the zoo staff didn’t want Gus to scare children or their parents, so they put up barriers to keep visitors farther away from the window. Gus soon started to swim in endless figure eights.” I happened to visit Gus during his ‘figure eight’ period. I’ve seen sadder sights in zoos, but this was particularly horrible because you could see - no, that’s not enough. You could really feel he was slowly going crazy. 

07/17/14 • 10:25 AM • GeneralNaturePsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

WaPo: There’s so much that science will never be able to explain.

“Science works under strict boundaries, and as hard as we may try, we can’t go beyond them. To know all answers, we need to start by knowing all questions. And that is simply impossible. Our view of the world will always be incomplete.” That’s not necessarily ‘bad’.

07/16/14 • 02:04 PM • PsychologyScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Reason.com: Mom Jailed Because She Let Her 9-Year-Old Daughter Play in the Park Unsupervised.

Pffft. I walked by myself to kindergarten. Today, state-enforced helicopter parenting? Man, I’m so glad I grew up when I did.

07/16/14 • 09:57 AM • ChildhoodHome & LivingLawPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

SciAm: Kids on Screen-Time Diet Lost Weight and Got Better Grades.

Parents are in a much more powerful position than they realize.”  The ‘idiot box’ remains the ‘idiot box’ … or so it seems here.

07/15/14 • 02:34 PM • ChildhoodEntertainmentMotion GraphicsPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Salon: Is J.K. Rowling the new George Lucas?

But while it’s fine to return to the universe and make small changes, it’s another to start attempting to change the ways in which fans interpret it.”  Danger, Will Robinson.

07/15/14 • 01:58 PM • ArtsBooksChildhoodHistoryPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LRB: Emily Witt/Diary - Burning Man.

Explains Burning Man better than anything else I’ve read.

07/11/14 • 08:53 AM • EntertainmentGeneralPsychologyTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The New Yorker: The Potato Salad Guy Should Keep Every Penny.

… to pretend that a reward is always (or even ever) commensurate with the amount of work one does is to misconstrue how the world works. If potato salad leads people to reflect on the injustices of modern American capitalism, then we really may be on to something.

07/09/14 • 02:46 PM • HistoryInternetPsychologySocial Media • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times/Upshot: How Birth Year Influences Political Views.

If you push the meter to my birth year (1959), I think the graph is a bit off. I was 14 when Nixon left office in disgrace. I don’t think you could throw a stone and hit *any* Republicans at that time.

07/08/14 • 08:55 AM • PersonalPoliticsPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Seattle Times: Why in the world I hand-wrote my emails – and what it taught me about how we wr

More loafs, less crumbs.

07/07/14 • 09:17 AM • InternetPsychologySocial MediaWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times: Why the Research on Viewing Is Best Ignored.

Anyway, yes, television affects our lives, as do microwaves, cellphones, cars, polyester, Tupperware. You can either study those effects to death — ‘Study Finds That Trying to Keep Up With Studies of TV Viewing Causes Insanity’ — or just accept that there’s a good-bad trade-off in watching television, and that you should negotiate it as best as you can, using common sense.

07/03/14 • 11:04 AM • ChildhoodEntertainmentHome & LivingPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus: Face-Off - Facebook Vs. Reality.

Someone who’s not on Facebook is sketchy. It’s like people who don’t drink. You can’t trust them.”  Bwah-hah-hah-hah. Like NYC in the 80’s - if you weren’t seeing a shrink like everyone else, you had to be an axe-murderer. And the author, Bibi Deitz, sounds like she lives in Santa Fe. Go for it, kiddo.

07/02/14 • 10:04 AM • InternetMobilePsychologySocial Media • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Mag: When ‘I Believe’ Backfires — Science of Us.

Positive thinking has its place, but don’t mistake the warm fuzzies that accompany daydreaming about achieving your goals for, you know, actually achieving those goals.

07/02/14 • 09:36 AM • GeneralPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Scientist: Near-death experiences are overwhelmingly peaceful.

Laureys’s team will now try to find an objective measure of such experiences by scanning the entire brains of people who say they have just had a near-death experience after a cardiac arrest. The team will look for small scars that might reflect the after-effects of the event.” Good luck finding that objective measure ...

07/01/14 • 08:14 AM • HealthPsychologyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Telegraph.UK: The practice of practising.

How you practice is how you perform, or so said my classical guitar instructor. And she was right.

07/01/14 • 07:51 AM • MusicPsychology • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The AV Club: Facebook tinkered with users’ feeds for a massive psychology experiment.

Told you. Involuntary psychoanalysis. Mind control. Dogs and cats, living together … Via LakeFxDan on FB.

06/27/14 • 04:49 PM • Human RightsInternetMobilePsychologySecuritySocial Media • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Pastry Box Project: Let’s Talk About Comments.

Pro-.

06/25/14 • 12:50 PM • InternetPsychologyWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LiveScience: Tempted by Cookies? New Way to Boost Self-Control Found.

The scientists found the explicit-zero format made immediate rewards less appealing. This led volunteers to choose delayed rewards more often than immediate rewards.” A later payoff is not always guaranteed in real life. I think that’s a weakness to the study.

06/25/14 • 12:38 PM • PsychologyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
Page 1 of 96 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »