dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

BBC: Cream bassist Jack Bruce dies, aged 71.

We all now reside in the white room with black curtains. RIP, man.

10/25/14 • 10:28 AM • HistoryMusic • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times: Joan Quigley, Astrologer to a First Lady, Is Dead at 87.

... an astrologer had set the time for summit meetings, presidential debates, Reagan’s 1985 cancer surgery, State of the Union addresses and much more. Without an O.K. from the astrologer, he said, Air Force One did not take off.” The unelected woman who ran the US government. We all knew about this, yet noone really wanted to believe it. No wonder politics is so screwed up.

10/24/14 • 10:58 PM • HistoryPolitics • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Reuters: Some U.S. hospitals weigh withholding care to Ebola patients.

This is another example of how this 21st century viral threat has pulled us back into the 19th century.” During the European cholera epidemics, they’ll haul sick folks out to the pyres before they’d expired. Frightened humans do some pretty horrific things.

10/24/14 • 11:36 AM • HealthHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Art Newspaper: Tullio’s Adam returns to view at the Met.

One of its greatest treasure, Tullio Lombardo’s life-sized marble sculpture of the nude Adam crashed to the stone floor as its medium-density plywood stand buckled and collapsed.”  Even the Art Newspaper doesn’t proof its copy.

10/24/14 • 11:30 AM • ArtsGeneralHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Italian Ways: Flying high with Leonardo.

Wooden models of Leonardo’s most famous flying machines.

10/24/14 • 11:19 AM • ArtsHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: The half-life of disaster.

As long as disaster capitalism reigns – which no doubt will be as long as capitalism itself reigns – the world will be caught in a vicious circle: that of responding by increasingly draconian and ill-advised means to a threat environment whose dangers the response only contributes to intensifying.”  Via wood s lot.

10/23/14 • 11:34 AM • EconomicsGeneralHistoryPoliticsPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Western Digs: Allosaurus Died From Stegosaur Spike to the Crotch, Wyoming Fossil Shows.

Bad enough it got whacked in the nads; worse that it infected and abcessed.  Jeebus, what a way to go.

10/23/14 • 11:07 AM • HistoryScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: Head of near-intact marble sphinx discovered at mysterious fourth century BC Greek tomb.

The sphinx’s head belongs to the body of a sphinx which was found previously.” Uh-oh. May indicate looting, IMHO. Broken off, left behind.

Later: More. perhaps I speak too soon. Still.

10/23/14 • 10:47 AM • HistoryScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Things of Interest: iMac with Retina 5K display vs. the Original Apple Mac.

That tiny black-and-white rectangle crammed into the bottom-left corner was cutting-edge technology three decades ago.” And I was so excited to buy one.

10/22/14 • 02:53 PM • AppleDesignHistory • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Statesman: Treasure trails - how museums became diplomatic fixers.

Yes. I used to think antiquities should be repatriated; the Bamiyan Buddhas and other events of late have convinced me it is better to take mankind’s common heritage and spread it as widely as possible so we cannot lose it. So I vote ‘no’ on the Elgin marbles now.

10/22/14 • 10:21 AM • ArtsHistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Soundcloud: NASA.

Geek out. First time I’ve heard John Glenn’s flight since that orange 45RPM record that came with my GI Joe space capsule.

10/22/14 • 09:56 AM • HistoryMusicPersonalScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BBC: WW2 U-boat found with ship it sank off North Carolina.

Most people associate the Battle of the Atlantic with the cold, icy waters of the North Atlantic but few people realise how close the war actually came to America’s shores.” “Most people.” The older Princetonians would tell stories of the skies lit up by the thousands of tons of shipping burning off NJ’s shore. I suppose it’s not in any Texas-approved schoolbooks anymore.

10/22/14 • 09:52 AM • HistoryScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Youtube: Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey Trailer.

In case you haven’t heard, it’s being remastered and rereleased to theatres.  The trailer’s too discontiguous for my taste. The imagery marginally more contrasty/saturated.

Interesting to find out others remember the ‘blue food’ sequence as I do. And I never read the book!  Bowman finds shelves of boxes of blue powder, and gets a bit dramatic with it. One assumes this is synthesized food for his consumption, graciously offered by his ‘hosts’.

It *was* in the film. Don’t let anyone tell you you’re crazy.

10/21/14 • 03:43 PM • EntertainmentHistory • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Coolist: 1957 Ford Thunderbird - F-Code.

Drool.

10/21/14 • 02:46 PM • ConsumptionDesignHistoryVehicles • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: In the 1970s, women were making big gains in computer science. Then they fell behind.

What happened in the mid-1980s? You should listen to the podcast for the full story, but the short answer is that as computers first moved into the home, they were mostly seen as toys — and those toys were marketed to boys and men.” There’s got to be something else at work here. Home computers can’t be the only reason. The Macintosh became big right around that time, and nearly every graphic design station was being jockeyed by a very capable woman. And the phalanxes of word processing folks in the office ... mostly women. This just sounds like an offkey tuning fork, this claim. Too pat. Something more complex was going on.

10/21/14 • 12:59 PM • ComputingHistoryHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BookForum: Innovators Abroad.

... technological development is also a human story — one that involves politics, war, culture, discrimination, social upheaval, and a great deal of human exploitation thousands of miles down the production line, in Congo’s coltan mines and Shenzhen’s brutal factories.

10/21/14 • 10:48 AM • BooksHistoryHuman RightsScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: Rothschild pistols seized by the Nazis in 1939 and stored in a salt mine during WWII for s

As gorgeous a set of flintlocks as I’ve ever seen ... at least, from the top view. Silver’s not a very good structural component for a firearm, so I assume it’s mostly decoration. But what decoration.

10/21/14 • 10:37 AM • ConsumptionDesignHistoryHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

UPI: Led Zeppelin sees ‘Stairway to Heaven’ lawsuit move forward.

You knew this would happen. LZ will settle out of court, yet again. I point you back here, for the umpteenth time. Settled out of court for “Dazed and Confused.” Settled out of court over “Whole Lotta Love.” 

10/20/14 • 06:32 PM • HistoryLawMusic • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Daily Mail.UK: Tutankhamun had girlish hips, a club foot and buck teeth ...

Some interesting theoretical leaps being taken here.

10/20/14 • 12:58 PM • HistoryScholarlyScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Exactly, precisely why we were all glad to see bell bottoms go away.

This. 

10/20/14 • 11:01 AM • ConsumptionDesignHistory • (5) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The New Yorker: The Real Amazon Warriors.

... the horse was the great equalizer, along with the bow and arrow, which meant that a woman could be just as fast, just as deadly, as a man.” Those following a certain issue in the news, should be warned.

10/20/14 • 09:36 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Harvard University Press: The digital Loeb Classical Library is now online.

Here. Students of Latin and Greek rejoice.

10/17/14 • 07:47 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: The Morgan showcases one of its greatest illuminated manuscripts ... The Crusader Bible.

Neat.

10/17/14 • 07:00 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryReligion • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: How AP US History classes became the new culture war battleground.

My time in AP History seemed to revolve around the Civil War. The only thing I recall from that course was discussions of the Gag Rule. It really didn’t give me more information than I was already finding through my own curiousity at the public library and my old man’s collection of books (reading materials for his officer’s courses in the Marines). The original three-volume set of Lee’s Lieutenants: A Study in Command, for instance.

10/17/14 • 10:13 AM • HistoryPersonalScholarly • (3) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BarnFinds: The First El Camino?

Another nice one.

10/16/14 • 04:56 PM • ConsumptionDesignHistoryVehicles • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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