dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

Guardian.UK: Home-built plane crashes in Idaho en route to experimental aircraft convention.

This points more to engine failure, than any sort of specific ‘home-built’ issue. Lancairs are really nice planes. Media loves to make homebuilders sound like crazy daredevils with no regard for their own lives. Just as they love to cite “failed to file a flight plan” as a cause of an accident. I’ll put in another plug for ballistic parachutes on single-engine aircraft.

07/29/14 • 12:32 PM • GeneralTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Phys.org: Researchers achieve ‘holy grail’ of battery design - A stable lithium anode.

Of all the materials that one might use in an anode, lithium has the greatest potential.

07/29/14 • 11:58 AM • ComputingConsumptionEnvironmentalGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mashable: ManServants Startup Is Not a Joke and It’s Not a Gigolo Service.

Everyone who watches it thinks it’s a parody. [snip] Even the name of the company sounds like a joke. But it’s not.” You go, girls.

07/29/14 • 10:54 AM • GeneralSmall BusinessSocial Media • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Jarvis - Your SMS Personal Assistant.

Interesting concept.

07/28/14 • 11:08 AM • GeneralSmall Business • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Seattle.gov: Space Needle Still Standing After Reported Drone Strike.

Another dope. Good luck to the President’s EO; the FAA is the proper venue, no matter what others say. If that thing had broken its props against the Needle, it could have killed or seriously injured someone on the way down. In a “Me, Myself and I” culture, this can’t end well without regulations.

07/24/14 • 10:52 PM • GeneralHealthLawMotion GraphicsPolitics • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

CNet: iPhone 5S vs. train goes exactly like you’d expect.

I despair of youth today. An iPhone won’t derail a train. The concept behind using pennies was not to derail a train, but to put enough of a slicker material (copper offers less traction than the rails, working as a lubricant) between the wheels and the rails to slow or stop the train. 

Not enough kids are growing up in rural areas, sans helicopter parents. I think it’s a huge, HUGE problem.

07/24/14 • 10:47 PM • ChildhoodGeneralHistoryNews • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

I thought people bought/adopted dogs to help get themselves into shape?

Silly me.

07/24/14 • 12:13 PM • ConsumptionGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Upgrading the system to Mavericks today.

Pulled a bootable copy with SuperDuper. Running Time Machine *one more time*.  Think that’s enough?  You’ll hear from me ‘on the other side.’

Later: Postponed until sometime tomorrow. Realized it’s time to delete old apps, upgrade a few others … empty some junk off the internal drive.

07/20/14 • 09:10 AM • AppleGeneralPersonal • (4) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Verge: Japan’s new Cruise Train is a luxury hotel on rails.

Impressive.

07/18/14 • 10:21 AM • DesignGeneralTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Wired: Even the Gorillas and Bears in Our Zoos Are Hooked on Prozac.

In fact when Gus first arrived from an Ohio zoo in 1988, his favorite game was stalking children from the underwater window in his pool. [snip] But the zoo staff didn’t want Gus to scare children or their parents, so they put up barriers to keep visitors farther away from the window. Gus soon started to swim in endless figure eights.” I happened to visit Gus during his ‘figure eight’ period. I’ve seen sadder sights in zoos, but this was particularly horrible because you could see - no, that’s not enough. You could really feel he was slowly going crazy. 

07/17/14 • 10:25 AM • GeneralNaturePsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: The ‘not everyone should go to college’ argument is classist and wrong.

More useful, applicable intelligence is never a bad thing. Problem is, not all colleges are in the business of increasing intelligence.

07/16/14 • 10:20 AM • ChildhoodGeneralScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: We Looked Deeply into the Trite - More Origins of Literary Cliches.

Ah, well.  Perhaps the absense of clichés makes the heart grow fonder? You might want to peruse the ClichéSite to see what you should avoid.

07/14/14 • 10:03 AM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus: Revelations Of A First-time Novelist.

“Once a manuscript leaves your desk, subject matter is the primary (and often only) way it is discussed. So if you haven’t figured out a quick way to answer that cringe-inducing question ‘What’s your book about?’ in a way that interests other people, somebody else will.

07/14/14 • 09:48 AM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Curator [Visual Notes App for iPad].

Looks tres interesting. I’m always a sucker for apps like this.

07/11/14 • 10:25 AM • AppleGeneralInternetMobileSoftware • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LRB: Emily Witt/Diary - Burning Man.

Explains Burning Man better than anything else I’ve read.

07/11/14 • 08:53 AM • EntertainmentGeneralPsychologyTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

PC World: Cloud storage vs. external hard drives: Which really offers the best bang for your buck?.

Cloud is starting to win. I’ll have to look closer now.

07/10/14 • 10:21 AM • GeneralHardwareInternetPhotographySoftware • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

JunkCulture: Man Glides Down City Streets on a Wooden Pallet Modified to Ride on Trolley Tracks.

Hacking mass transit; love it.

07/08/14 • 01:44 PM • GeneralTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Holiday: Living in a Trailer (1952).

Talk about ‘evergreen content’via MeFi.

07/08/14 • 09:59 AM • GeneralHistoryHome & LivingTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Speaking American.

An English writer’s relation to the geography of Britain feels familiar. It’s not exotic or particularly dangerous, unless you’re talking Heathcliff and the North Yorkshire Moors; there’s always the reassurance of a church, or a pub, or a field of daffodils just around the bend. But the vastness of the American landscape opens up possibilities, thrilling and threatening, for a writer.” The landscape defines us, in so many ways.

07/07/14 • 02:32 PM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Kickstarter: AirDog, World’s First Auto-follow Drone for GoPro Camera.

Woof.

07/03/14 • 11:27 AM • GeneralHardwareMotion Graphics • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Mashable: FAA Has Clamped Down on Realtors Using Drones ‘for Months’.

Sorry, there are huge differences between hobby and commercial use. You can see from these videos that the realtors are breaking property boundaries into neighbors’ airspace and flying in the general public airspace (over public roads, waterways, etc.). A drone is a disruptive machine: a noisy device, and even with blade guards it can do a bit of damage if lost control of (everyone seems to have a ‘lost control’ story to relate). Last time I saw one in use near a busy road, the rubbernecking alone could cause an accident.

Are drones being picked on unfairly? No. If a realtor wanted to do aerials of a house and hired a crane to do it with, they’d have to obtain appropriate permits for public use, personnel to clear traffic, etc. I think that’s what the FAA is aiming for - notifying the neighbors ahead of time, and simply making sure the public is safe. That means a level of skill in operation, too. My bet: Look for N-style numbers on commercial drones, professional testing and professional licensing of some sort. Signs and notifications in operating areas, much like a commercial film set. 

Rather than individual liberty, drone operators should be proactive in talking about their safety procedures while operating their little machines. I’d bet the FAA would really appreciate that, and take a softer stance. Anyone talking about it? Not in this article.  If I were a realtor, it would be the first thing I would be doing - showing off my safety protocols, perhaps in a video as well. Be smart, not grasping.

07/02/14 • 11:05 AM • GeneralHardwareMotion GraphicsPhotography • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Abominable news - scientists rule out yetis.

The yeti, and his shambling hairy cousins the bigfoot, almasty, sasquatch and migyur, may still be out there, high in the snowy peaks of the Himalayas, Rocky Mountains or Urals – but they have escaped a team of scientists who have been testing dozens of samples, all claimed to be genuine chunks of yeti fur.  They have turned out to be hairs from depressingly familiar animals including cows, raccoons, horses, dogs, sheep, a Malayan tapir, a porcupine, and, in the case of one sample from Texas, a human being. And also a blade of grass and a strand of fibreglass.”  I think, Guardian, this means it is not ‘still out there.’

07/02/14 • 10:31 AM • GeneralScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Mag: When ‘I Believe’ Backfires — Science of Us.

Positive thinking has its place, but don’t mistake the warm fuzzies that accompany daydreaming about achieving your goals for, you know, actually achieving those goals.

07/02/14 • 09:36 AM • GeneralPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

BarnFinds: Corvette Graveyard in Upstate New York.

All that seems to be left, is the fibergrass.

06/25/14 • 10:33 AM • GeneralHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Alyxandria: I Can’t Afford a Bachelor’s Degree, So I’m Making My Own.

Some have been talking about ‘disruption’ … a great example, on the hoof.

06/24/14 • 09:28 AM • GeneralScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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