dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

The Airship: We Looked Deeply into the Trite - More Origins of Literary Cliches.

Ah, well.  Perhaps the absense of clichés makes the heart grow fonder? You might want to peruse the ClichéSite to see what you should avoid.

07/14/14 • 10:03 AM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus: Revelations Of A First-time Novelist.

“Once a manuscript leaves your desk, subject matter is the primary (and often only) way it is discussed. So if you haven’t figured out a quick way to answer that cringe-inducing question ‘What’s your book about?’ in a way that interests other people, somebody else will.

07/14/14 • 09:48 AM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Emily Parker.

In specific, about her book on international bloggers, Now I Know Who My Comrades Are. On my list.

07/13/14 • 04:27 PM • ArtsBooksHuman RightsWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate/Book Review: Amanda Petrusich’s Do Not Sell at Any Price.

If you own a rare LP, it is still comparably common, while a rare 78 might be the only one anywhere in the world. As Petrusich puts it, ‘The distinction is acute, comparable to collecting pebbles versus collecting diamonds.’

07/11/14 • 11:40 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryMusic • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Messy Nessy Chic: The French Castles fit for a Pigeon (Literally).

Dovecots! Or Dovecotes. Whichever. You see these mentioned in historic European works all the time. I’ve only seen a few up until this article.  Great addition to fill out imagined landscapes and architecture. “He died alone in a dovecot …”

07/11/14 • 08:27 AM • ArtsBooksDesignHistoryTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Authors’ incomes collapse to ‘abject’ levels.

This rapid decline in both author incomes and in the numbers of those writing full-time could have serious implications for the economic success of the creative industries in the UK.”  Overlooked this item the other day. My bad.

07/10/14 • 09:11 AM • ArtsBooksHome & Living • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: The Race to Destroy Priceless Manuscripts as Idiotically as Possible.

He brewed a barrell of Speciall Ale, his use was to stop the bung-hole with a Sheet of Manuscript; he sayd nothing did it so well.Oof.

07/09/14 • 02:55 PM • ArtsBooks • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

SF New Mexican; George RR Martin gives the finger to fans who say he’ll die before he finishes.

“I find that question pretty offensive, frankly, when people start speculating about my death and my health. [snip] So f–k you to those people.” He’s pretty darned active around these parts. I side with George.

07/09/14 • 12:05 PM • BooksEntertainmentSanta Fe Local • (4) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Messy Nessy Chic: Just some 300 year-old Giant Books.

Nearly a meter long, made with animal skin wood and leather caps containing scripts for religious ceremonies in convents during the colonial era, they were found by a graphic documents restorer, Tania Estrada, who tracked down the books which were donated to various libraries in Mexico in 1915.

07/09/14 • 10:34 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: Harry Potter makes first appearance for seven years as he turns 34.

A weighted hors d’oeuvre? When other projects don’t match their expectations, authors tend to return to the ‘never again’ stories.

07/08/14 • 10:21 AM • ArtsBooksChildhood • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Speaking American.

An English writer’s relation to the geography of Britain feels familiar. It’s not exotic or particularly dangerous, unless you’re talking Heathcliff and the North Yorkshire Moors; there’s always the reassurance of a church, or a pub, or a field of daffodils just around the bend. But the vastness of the American landscape opens up possibilities, thrilling and threatening, for a writer.” The landscape defines us, in so many ways.

07/07/14 • 02:32 PM • ArtsBooksGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Irish Times: Word for Word — is the end nigh for the e-book?

What irks the ‘digerati’ is the failure of ebooks to dent the affection heavy book-buyers retain for the thing-ness of the original Gutenbergian model. Bibliophiles abhor the impermanence of ebooks because downloads confer no sense of ownership or collectability.

07/06/14 • 11:20 AM • ArtsBooksInternetMobile • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Independent.UK: Winds of Winter release date - George RR Martin’s next book set for 2017 release

Taking bets.

07/02/14 • 04:45 PM • ArtsBooksSanta Fe Local • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Yorker: Héctor Tobar - How the Chilean Miners Survived.

Long and harrowing. Worthy read.

06/30/14 • 01:42 PM • BooksHistoryTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Mag: Here’s What the Future of Reading Looks Like.

‘E-readers are looking like the next iPod,’ Mashable writes today, noting that smartphones and tablets with e-reader apps are poised to cannibalize sales of dedicated e-readers in the same way that the iPhone – which had all the capabilities of an iPod, plus calling and texting and tons of other apps – killed its single-feature predecessor.” Told you so.

06/29/14 • 12:40 PM • BooksHardwareMobileSoftware • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Harper’s: What Is Literature?

“In effect, the canon formalized modern literature as a select body of imaginative writings that could stand up to the Greek and Latin texts. Although exclusionary by nature, it was originally intended to impart a sense of unity; critics hoped that a tradition of great writers would help create a national literature. What was the apotheosis of Shakespeare and Milton if not an attempt to show the world that England and not France — especially not France — had produced such geniuses?

06/23/14 • 09:48 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The New Yorker: A Brief History of Oaths and Books.

But the use of any text during a swearing-in ceremony is, if not exactly a gimmick, at least more style than substance. There is no constitutional requirement for any federal official—firefighter, ambassador, or President—to take the oath of office over a particular text or, in fact, over any text at all.” Using an e-text? Death of the practice within a decade.

06/20/14 • 02:55 PM • BooksHistoryLaw • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LA Review of Books: The 100-Year-Old Who Taught Garbo to Waltz.

During a career that stretched from Josef von Sternberg silents to Streisand musicals, Houghton was propositioned by a Munchkin, blew off Lucille Ball, and taught Greta Garbo to waltz for the 1937 costume drama Conquest.

06/11/14 • 08:39 AM • ArtsBooksEntertainmentHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

AP: Court - Searchable Books Database is ‘Fair Use.’

The library lets the general public search for particular terms but shows only page numbers where the term is found, unless the copyright owner has authorized more extensive information.” Given the last manuscript I had read by commercial OCR provider, I think it will be in authors’ best interest to personally verify that any scans are accurate and correct … and that could end up an onerous and costly-in-time task.

06/11/14 • 08:23 AM • BooksLaw • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Lost Type Blog: Diagrams – John Philipps Emslie.

“John Philipps Emslie illustrated a large number of maps and contributed to the British topographical archive in the mid to late 1800s. These astronomical and geographical illustrations from his body of work are insane.

06/05/14 • 04:58 PM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Compound Interest: The Aroma of Books.

Infographic. I think I would have preferred some beautifully-formatted text to explain the situation.

06/05/14 • 09:14 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times: What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades.

When children had drawn a letter freehand, they exhibited increased activity in three areas of the brain that are activated in adults when they read and write: the left fusiform gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus and the posterior parietal cortex. By contrast, children who typed or traced the letter or shape showed no such effect. The activation was significantly weaker.

06/03/14 • 09:04 AM • ArtsBooksChildhoodHealthScience • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

PS Mag: Seduced by Gore Vidal.

Whereas Buckley produces one of Evelyn Waugh’s anti-socialist epigrams idly, like removing a kerchief from the pocket of his blazer, Vidal’s points of reference in these televised sparring matches are precise, sedulously selected from his self-compiled encyclopedia of a brain.

05/30/14 • 12:11 PM • BooksHistoryNewsScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

New Yorker: Reading in an Emergency.

I’m not even entirely opposed, as I know some authors and critics are, to the notion that reading can be ‘good for you.’ But by literalizing this fact—by making print books the antidote for an actual disease — ‘The Word Exchange’ comes dangerously close to arguing for literature as medicine. An emergency gives reading a practical urgency, but practical urgency and literature have little business mixing.” A loved one is raped or murdered; would a quick read of The Count of Monte Cristo bring anything to the experience? I don’t know, but it might serve as a better deterrent than the death penalty.

05/30/14 • 11:52 AM • BooksInternetPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus: Check Out These Girls ‘Write’ Now.

Title improved.  “And don’t miss this year’s Girls Write Now anthology, Breaking Through, with a Foreword from NYC’s First Lady Chirlane McCray, out on June 3.”

05/29/14 • 09:59 AM • ArtsBooksChildhoodHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
Page 3 of 97 pages  <  1 2 3 4 5 >  Last »