dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

Harvard University Press: The digital Loeb Classical Library is now online.

Here. Students of Latin and Greek rejoice.

10/17/14 • 07:47 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: The Morgan showcases one of its greatest illuminated manuscripts ... The Crusader Bible.

Neat.

10/17/14 • 07:00 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryReligion • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LRB: Adam Shatz reviews ‘Congo’ by David Van Reybrouck.

Congo’s history has been ‘epic’, except in the one respect that might have lent a redemptive cast to its many troubles: the heart of Africa is still very far from seizing control of its destiny.

10/15/14 • 12:07 PM • ArtsBooksEconomicsHuman RightsPolitics • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Observer.UK: What drives writers to drink?

Wait! I know this! AMAZON. Well, not in the context of this article perhaps ...

10/14/14 • 12:16 PM • ArtsBooksHistory • (3) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Vox: Marvel wants to give us the next Hunger Games.

Diving into the Young Adult book market headfirst. When the zombie books follow their lead, I suppose we need to change ‘penny dreadfuls’ to ‘dollar dreadfuls’?

10/14/14 • 10:55 AM • ArtsBooksChildhoodEntertainment • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

MedievalBooks: Medieval Desktops.

Readers would usually have a pen nearby even when they were just reading. After all, remarks and critiques needed to be added to the margin at the spur of the moment. ‘Penless’ images, while rare, often show a crowded desktop.

10/12/14 • 10:47 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: Annie Baker’s The Flick and the joy of reading plays.

One of the things I still do to stay fluent (in case my stutter ever comes back) is to read plays aloud. It’s fun. We used to have a small group of literati in college who’d get together every so often and just read (and act, of course) something off-the-cuff. Beats Trivial Pursuit. I was once told I sound like a mix between Robert Goulet and Yogi Bear when reading “Hamlet.”

10/10/14 • 09:12 AM • ArtsBooksGeneralHealthPersonal • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: The Best New Books on Project Gutenberg.

Useful!

10/09/14 • 02:18 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryInternet • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Nautilus: Shakespeare’s Genius Is Nonsense.

We are provided with so much activity from so many overlapping and interacting relationships between words that we do not notice the jags and hiccups, nor our own proficiency in accommodating for them.” A jester of words and rhythm.

10/09/14 • 01:17 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (8) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Dissent: The Rise of Reagan’s America.

“... the only way to avoid the distortions of memory and the snap-shot bias of journalism is deep and critical engagement with archival sources.” Example of how one can look at the same set of facts, and cherry-pick them into a very different conclusion. I’ll probably borrow this from the library so I can get mad at it.

10/07/14 • 01:56 PM • BooksHistoryPolitics • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Digital Reader: Adobe is Spying on Users, Collecting Data on Their eBook Libraries.

“Adobe isn’t just tracking what users are doing in DE4; this app was also scanning my computer, gathering the metadata from all of the ebooks sitting on my hard disk, and uploading that data to Adobe’s servers. In. Plain. Text.

Later: It seems Ars Technica has confirmed most of this.

10/07/14 • 10:04 AM • AdobeArtsBooksHuman RightsInternetLawMobile • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Italian Ways: Attilio Mussino’s unconventional Pinocchio.

I remember seeing some of these renderings ... someplace.

10/06/14 • 10:37 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Telegraph.UK: Can’t get into highbrow novels? Ditch them, says Nick Hornby.

Books that mean nothing at certain ages can take on whole new life at different points in your life-cycle. I’ve said this for years.  Most of what they tried to force-feed us in school took on different meaning once I had significant life experience under my belt.  Doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try - if one is subtle enough to pick up the wisdom in the prose, one can have a leg up on life.

10/06/14 • 10:26 AM • ArtsBooksChildhoodPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Atlantic: Saving Paris’s Oldest Bookstore.

“This month, the Librairie Delamain’s lease is up for renewal by the Qatari company Constellation Hotel Holdings, which owns the block-wide property that also houses the soon-to-be-renovated Hôtel du Louvre. The company plans to double the bookstore’s rent to 100,000 euros per year—nearly a tenth of their annual revenue. With already slim margins, the shop would be forced to shut down or abandon the storefront where it has been since 1906 (the business itself dates to 1700).

09/30/14 • 12:32 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Amtrak: Meet the 24 Writers Selected for the Amtrak Residency Program.

Hmmm. Seems they went for established voices; I would have taken a chance with nascent writers (of all age groups).

09/25/14 • 01:48 PM • ArtsBooks • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Metafilter: “remove line breaks? where have you been all my life!”

Welcome to TextMechanic.com!

09/18/14 • 09:06 AM • BooksProgrammingSoftwareWeblogs • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

InspirationFeed: 20 Simple Tips That Will Dramatically Improve Your Writing.

Don’t use words unless you know what they mean.” @^#$@$%^@

09/17/14 • 11:38 AM • ArtsBooksWeblogs • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Natty Bumppo, Soviet Folk Hero.

This took the top of my head off. Incredible.

09/15/14 • 07:15 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryPoliticsTravel • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times: Line by Line, E-Books Turn Poet-Friendly.

There’s absolutely no reason an e-book couldn’t display complex formatting, other than because of cheap-to-produce maximize-profit laziness. This is where Apple’s book offerings can be better.

09/15/14 • 07:15 PM • ArtsBooksDesignGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Writing Advice from D. H. Lawrence at 21.

Things which are obvious are worth no more than a mention. If you cannot tell people of something they have not seen, or have not thought, it is hardly worthwhile to write at all. Try and study people, and the living soul which is the essence of mankind. If you have externals, they must represent something.

09/12/14 • 09:38 AM • ArtsBooksHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

NY Times: The Death of Adulthood in American Culture.

Every white American male under the age of 50 is some version of the character he plays on “Louie,” a show almost entirely devoted to the absurdity of being a pale, doughy heterosexual man with children in a post-patriarchal age. Or, if you prefer, a loser.”  AO Scott rips out a doozy. Tangentially, I’ll also mention that A&E reportedly not only dropped “Longmire” because they didn’t own the franchise, but because the fans were too old. God forbid you should have a plot that plays out over months and is delightfully unpredictable, even if you’ve read the novels. Then again, the fault may be worse than simply an inability to mature ... it may reside in the fact we don’t read at all {link via Euan Semple on FB}.

Later: If you want a book that embodies the ‘adulthood’ points mentioned by the author above, you might wish to try Daniel Martin, by John Fowles. An incredibly rich book. Discussing this tome is the first time I ever described prose as ‘loamy’. I’m still learning how to write from it. Try the library first though, see if you like it. Definite difference from YA-style modern novels.

09/11/14 • 02:38 PM • ArtsBooksEntertainmentPersonalPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Wikipedia - use of the term ‘Shipping’ (fandom).

I ran across this a while ago in a discussion about a book series; a term I hadn’t heard at the time. Thought others might appreciate the clue.

09/11/14 • 10:34 AM • ArtsBooksEntertainmentGeneral • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus/book review: Flight 232.

When the aircraft hit, it hit hard, and those unsecured babies and toddlers were thrown all over the cabin.  Few of these lap children made it out alive. It would be a wonderful observance of the anniversary of the crash if the FAA would require all passengers to have seats, and would protect people without discrimination based on age.

09/11/14 • 10:01 AM • BooksChildhoodTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The New Yorker: Why Walking Helps Us Think.

Joyce and Woolf were writers who transformed the quicksilver of consciousness into paper and ink. To accomplish this, they sent characters on walks about town. As Mrs. Dalloway walks, she does not merely perceive the city around her. Rather, she dips in and out of her past, remolding London into a highly textured mental landscape, ‘making it up, building it round one, tumbling it, creating it every moment afresh.’

09/10/14 • 05:36 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryPhysical Fitness • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: Reading insecurity - The crippling fear that the digital age has left you unable to read deep

“You should take a 20-second screen break if you’ve been gazing into your computer, smart phone, iPad, or e-reader for more than a half hour. I’ll wait. It’s OK if you don’t come back—we both know by now that most people won’t finish this article. If you do return, though, I’d like to bring up something that has been bothering me: reading insecurity.

09/10/14 • 09:57 AM • ArtsBooksComputingPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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