dangerousmeta!, the original new mexican miscellany, offering eclectic linkage since 1999.

Colossal: Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag.

J’adore.

08/08/14 • 10:46 AM • ArtsDesign • (1) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Slate: 250 years of English grammar usage advice.

For the past two and a half years, I’ve been working on a database of more than 75 usage guides and 123 usage problems in the English language, spanning a period of nearly 250 years. My two assistants and I call this project the Hyper Usage Guide of English or HUGE database and it’s based out of Leiden University in the Netherlands.” Aw, fantastic.

08/07/14 • 09:31 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryScholarly • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: A Graveyard Tour of Literature.

Graveyard visits render a surprising amount of information about a person.

08/07/14 • 04:41 PM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Return of the Cafe Racers: Under the influence pre-unit Triumph Tiger.

Sprung seat and passenger pad. These folks are thinkin’.  WANT.

08/07/14 • 11:36 AM • ArtsConsumptionDesign • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Behance Blog: Adobe Sketch - Natural drawing tools, seamlessly integrated with Behance.

Don’t know if I’d necessarily want to insta-post drawings.  Nice to have the feature, though, I’m sure.

08/07/14 • 10:19 AM • AdobeArtsInternetMobileSoftware • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Guardian.UK: The five worst book covers ever.

I remember that ‘Princess Bride’ cover; right when Boris Vallejo art was the ‘thing’ for fantasy books.

08/07/14 • 09:47 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: Roald Dahl - Certified Bad Ass.

It’s usually macho men like Ernest Hemingway or Jack London whom people think of when someone mentions intrepid 20th century writers, but Roald Dahl proves that one can entertain generations of children and still go down in history as a certifiable bad ass.

08/06/14 • 10:32 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

PS Mag: Fictional Stories Are More Moving Than We Predict.

New research finds people mistakenly believe real-life stories will be more emotionally gripping than those that are the products of an author’s imagination.” There are some who eschew all fiction, because biographies ‘tell how real people solved real issues.’ Then they find out how biographers and autobiographers engage fictional thinking and revisionism ...

08/06/14 • 09:52 AM • ArtsBooksPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Independent.UK: John Myatt - The artist and convicted forger on life and art in and out of prison.

The art industry has been nodding through paintings with extremely dubious histories.”  As I’ve suspected. Way too many ‘miracle’ discoveries lately.

08/05/14 • 02:22 PM • ArtsLaw • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Italian Ways: In awe of hard work - De Cagna light installations.

Wow. Scroll down to get the full effect.

08/05/14 • 02:10 PM • ArtsTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Millions: The Art of Close Writing

So-called omniscience is almost impossible. As soon as someone tells a story about a character, narrative seems to want to bend itself around that character, to take on his or her way of thinking and speaking. A novelist’s omniscience soon enough becomes a kind of secret sharing.”  Fun read.

08/05/14 • 12:06 PM • ArtsBooks • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Rumpus: Murder By Danielle Collobert.

Collobert left behind a handful of books, all produced in only twenty years. Like many writers who have chosen to end their own lives, her voice occasionally takes on a gravity that is, if nothing else, alarming, urgent.

08/05/14 • 11:37 AM • ArtsBooksPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

WaPo: Crimes of Passion.

Writing an opera about adultery, in this context, involves a great bait-and-switch, because while adultery was once a crime, love is not. Love, in fact, is supreme in Western culture: we are told that it is synonymous with God, that it conquers all, that it has its own laws, and that in its pure form it is one of the greatest things to which man can aspire. So a story about two adulterers can at once titillate and uplift: the passion outweighs the crime.

08/05/14 • 09:36 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Writer’s Digest: List of 50 Poetic Forms for Poets.

They’re all fun. My advice ... try something new when you’re really creatively stuck. And be sure to write ‘em down and save ‘em. What you hate today, you may find you love tomorrow.  They’re all worthy.

08/04/14 • 04:46 PM • ArtsBooksPersonal • (2) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

LA Times: Marina Abramovic Institute responds to critics of unpaid positions.

But the come-work-for-free ad — I mean, ‘volunteer’ — strikes a dissonant note when the foundation’s namesake has her multimillion-dollar real estate transactions regularly covered on Curbed. And when the organization seeking the unpaid work is fund-raising for a $20-million headquarters in New York’s Hudson Valley designed by starchitect Rem Koolhaas. Not to mention that the skills the institute is demanding for these positions is quite specialized.

08/04/14 • 09:31 AM • ArtsHome & LivingHuman RightsSmall Business • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Hyperallergic: Marina Abramović Institute Seeks So Much Unpaid Work.

Ugh.

08/01/14 • 02:09 PM • ArtsHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Longform: The Longform Guide to Miraculous Survivals.

Marked for later reading.

07/31/14 • 05:10 PM • ArtsBooksGeneralTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Hairpin: Go Read Alice - The History of the Diary Novel.

The diary novel canon is composed first of diary novels which have received significant (male) literary praise. But within this genre, the diary novel for women is an important and under-recognized sub-genre. These novels are usually evaluated on their historical merits because aesthetically, they are terrible: written by religious conservatives and/or befuddled men, often intended (in the Victorian era) to instruct.” Ugh.

07/31/14 • 03:10 PM • ArtsBooksHistoryHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Colossal: 888,246 Ceramic Poppies Flow Like Blood from the Tower of London to Commemorate WWI.

Tasteful and raw, at the same time. I approve.

07/31/14 • 02:51 PM • ArtsHuman RightsTravel • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Consulting Collections of Medieval Manuscripts Online.

Trove.

07/31/14 • 11:26 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Design You Trust: Little Giant Girl Marches through Liverpool.

Check the children’s faces, versus the adults. Adults are smiling; kids look a bit unsure. Having fantasy ‘come to life’ gives kids pause; ask any performer at Disney World. Or your average seasonal Santa Claus.

07/31/14 • 10:50 AM • ArtsChildhoodEntertainmentPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: I Read All of the Harry Potter Books for the First Time Over the Last Month.

Someone had to say it.

07/31/14 • 09:52 AM • ArtsBooksChildhoodPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

Paris Review: Emily Brontë’s Boring Birthday.

I’m afraid it’s true. Emily Brontë’s birthday letters are totally dull.” Doesn’t that give more evidence to a fertile imagination?

07/31/14 • 09:48 AM • ArtsBooksHistoryPsychology • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

ArtDaily: Philbrook Museum of Art announces receipt of the Hyatt collection of Hopi art.

Instructive; I’ll have to look into a pictorial history of sacred clowns. I suspect more modern ones have been influenced by Disney.  Even ancient cultures can’t exist in a vacuum.

07/31/14 • 09:30 AM • ArtsHistoryHuman Rights • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks

The Airship: Happy Birthday, Penguin, and Thanks for Inventing the Modern Paperback Book.

July 30 marks the 79th anniversary of a mass-market paperback revolution. On this date in 1934, publisher Allen Lane was supposedly struck by a fantastic epiphany while suffering from boredom at a British train station. The idea? To make good literature accessible to everyone.

07/30/14 • 09:06 AM • ArtsBooksHistory • (0) Comments • (0) Trackbacks
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